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An idiom rings through my head “curiosity killed the cat”. Where I learned it, I can’t recall, but its a comforting to my risk averse self.

Until, this year of change? Is it true? What about luck or serendipity leading to discoveries?

Checking the origin of the phrase, curiosity killed the cat, I discovered, there is a second part. “Satisfaction revived it”, alluding to the fact that a cat lands on its feet, unharmed.

What thought is ringing in your head? Explore it, dig out its truth. It may be time for a rejoiner.

Crisis as catalyst for change.

Do you have “words of wisdom” ringing in your head, which have outlived their usefulness? Such as “dont talk to strangers”, “people are out to get you”.

An idiom rings through my head “curiosity killed the cat”. Where I learned it, I can’t recall, but its a comforting to my risk averse self.

Until, this year of change? Is it true? What about luck or serendipity leading to discoveries?

Checking the origin of the phrase, curiosity killed the cat, I discovered, there is a second part. “Satisfaction revived it”, alluding to the fact that a cat lands on its feet, unharmed.

What thought is ringing in your head? Explore it, dig out its truth. It may be time for a rejoiner.

Crisis as catalyst for change.

Do you have “words of wisdom” ringing in your head, which have outlived their usefulness? Such as “dont talk to strangers”, “people are out to get you”.

Dear participant

As business students, we are embarking on an adventure – to discover this complex VUCA world.

Why do people say data is the new gold or the new oil? Oil has been in the ground for thousands of years. But until humans know how to tap it, the oil is useless.

So too with data. Today with supercomputers to tap the data, we have the birth of data analyst and the tools used, namely the Data scientific method.

Data scientific method:

  1. Ask a question.
  2. State a hypothesis about the answer to the question.
  3. Make a testable prediction that would provide evidence in favor of the hypothesis if correct.
  4. Test the prediction via an experiment involving data.
  5. Draw the appropriate conclusions through analyses of experimental results.

Knowing what question to ask is the first step because it helps clarify where the problem is. In BMGC, learn to understand the questions, they are handles for you to find the solution.

Dont memorise the answers because that can change.

The famous scientist Einstein was once asked why he set the same questions every year for final exams. To which he replied, the question is the same but the answers have changed. This is where data comes in. Data helps us know the answers have changed.

But first, learn the questions.

If you change the way you look at things, the things you look at, changes. Wayne Dyer

Be the change you wish to see in the world. Gandhi

“If you hate a person, you hate something in him that is part of yourself”. Herman Hesse

“Virtues and vices – like carpets and hats – obey the law of fashion, and at different times, society with infuriating inconsistency punishes or rewards the same trait.

What characteristic in Churchill, won him adulation and honors? The same characteristic that earned him censure: his love of war. He never changed, but the values of the world did.

And if the years before 1940 were a prelude, the years after the war were a long decline. In the 1945 election, even before Japan surrendered, Churchill was ejected from office. The public sensed in him the permanent relish for battle, and they wanted no more of it.

Ch13 Churchill’s Bellligerence, His Defining Characteristic from “Forty ways of looking at Churchill” by Gretchen Rubin.

Can our weakness be our strengths?

Is there such a thing as strength or weakness? Gretchen Rubin concluded Ch 12 with this observation “Churchill didn’t care what anyone else thought. He never shut up, he was rude, he was undignified. Churchill’s greatest fault was the fault of his greatest virtue. His disdain for other’s opinions gave him his own clear vision, and he saw what others missed. Willingness to consider all points of view can be a source of weakness as well as strength; in 1940, Churchill knew the true course and led the way without listening to anyone.”

Forty ways of looking at Churchill” by Gretchen Rubin.

My initial reaction to the PM’s announcement that the “circuit breaker” will be extended till 1 June 2020, was one of despondence. Failing to queue for my favourite bubble tea, I went to Chinatown to buy a box of plum wine roast chicken and Chinese roast duck. The food surprisingly tasted bland. The mind plays tricks on our desires.

Instead of mopping if an L shaped or W shaped recession awaits round the corner, what if I use the next 10 days as entering a meditative retreat, in my own home. Minus tv or news. Minus noise. Minus activity. Just deep breathing. Simple food. But

allowed to read and write.

allowed to walk.

allowed to listen

to me

Not judge.

  1. Always make your future bigger than your past.
  2. Always make your learning greater than your experience.
  3. Always make your contribution bigger than your reward.
  4. Always make your performance greater than your applause.
  5. Always make your gratitude greater than your success.
  6. Always make your enjoyment greater than your effort.
  7. Always make your cooperation greater than your status.
  8. Always make your confidence greater than your comfort.
  9. Always make your purpose greater than your money.
  10. Always make your questions bigger than your answers.

I recently chanced upon the writings of strategic coach Dan Sullivan whose 10 laws of growth are so inspiring if you, like me struggle with how opportunistic networking can be.

If we know that networking is necessary, whats holding us back? Fear of rejection.

1. Courage to step out. Curiosity to acquire diversity of experiences.

2. Commitment to change

3. Capability – deep work

4. Confidence

Adapted fron the 4Cs of Dan Sullivan.

Source: https://resources.strategiccoach.com/the-multiplier-mindset-blog/the-laws-of-lifetime-growth