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Tag Archives: #Gen Z#

Millennials or Generation Y (Born After 1980)

With Gen Y, full time work is no longer the only source of income, identity nor influence like it was for Boomers. Nor is workplace, the only way to connect with a community. Rather, this generation feels connected with a global community through technology and may get their income through the Gig economy.

Brought up in small nuclear families, sometimes without adult supervision because both parents have to work, Gen Y can be very independent and savvy with technology.

They value ownership and expressions of their creativity and individuality. Explosion of the internet has also given them power such as own social media channels and influencers.

What companies can do

• Career wise, this group is unlikely to be as loyal as Boomers. With a shrinking workforce, they have no problems moving from one organization to another for higher salary and better perks.

•Beyond monetary incentives, Gen Z can be motivated by skills training, mentoring, feedback.

•Gen Z are generally value leadership style that are more feelers than thinkers. Organisational Culture such as collaborative environment, is extremely important for Millennials

•Flexible schedules as rewards, time off to embrace outside interests, and embracing the latest technology to communicate are also important for Gen Y.

•Millennials also thrive with structure, stability, continued learning opportunities, and immediate feedback. Structured path and career planning

• Millennials like to be heard. Factor in one-to-one communication. [Lisa Orrell]

Gen Z (born after 1995)

•Starting to enter the workplace.

•Larger than baby boomers or Millennials. •Motivated by social rewards, mentorship, and constant feedback.

•Want to be do meaningful and be given responsibility.

•Demand flexible schedules.

•Experiential rewards and badges earned in gaming and opportunities for personal growth.

•Expect structure, clear directions, and transparency.

•Majority prefer face-to-face communication.

• They see the world as a connected global marketplace and likely to see short stints overseas as part of their career development and work in a multicultural workplace.

In one workplace survey, research group Millennial Branding found 53 percent of Gen Z respondents prefer face-to-face communication over tech tools like email (16 percent) and messaging (11 percent).

What companies can do

To attract Gen Z, companies need to move beyond traditional recruitment methods and move into gamification, social media, especially with video, pictures and interaction on application process via blogs, Linkedin or Instagram.

Companies may want to provide more information during orientation, internships and job rotation or structured career paths. One company provided clear indications to Gen Z on

  • Where they will start
  • The short-term goals they’re supposed to meet
  • The skills they’ll acquire
  • Where they’ll end up in a year

The company also trains in sound-bites and offers short-term quarterly recognition in terms of rewards, not that different from the bonus points in computer games.

It also provides increased responsibilities half-way through its eight-to-12 month training program, knowing today’s young people will jump to a new employer for a better opportunity.

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An must-have is for leaders to pick up career coaching skills and more face-time with Gen Z to agree on goals and outcomes. While Coaching has become an essential leadership skill, companies can consider Peer coaching. Baby Boomers and Gen X may be roped in to provide mentoring for Gen Z teams. But gone are the days of command and control.

Have a friend at work? And why it matters.

Culture differences in HR

Retaining Gen X at the workplace

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Photo: woven slippers I spotted on the Nakasendo Trail, Japan November 2018

Gen X (1965 and 1980)

For Gen X, work is not only a source of income, but where many get their identity, influence and connectedness with a community.

Gen X are currently at the peak of their careers taking over leadership of the company or waiting in the wings. They have experienced huge swings in economic boom and bust, witnessed retrenchment, burnout and technology disruption.

Challenges in retaining  Gen X is that they are not a homogenous group. There are at least 4 groups with their unique characteristics:

(i) Waiting to take over leadership from Baby Boomers

(ii) Those who distrust company lifelong employment yet have expertise and able to work independently with minimal supervision. This group is more entrepreneurial with desire more control over their time and goals. Some will move on to become start-up founders.

(iii) Another untapped group are highly educated spouses, primarily women who have taken time off to look after young children and now ready to return to the workforce.

(iv) Need time off to look after young children or aging parents.

What companies can do

(i) Provide mentorship from Baby Boomers, bonus to recognise their contributions and leadership assignments to stretch them. Give them opportunities to mentor Gen Y and Z.

(ii) Provide consulting opportunities in the firm and maintain open door in case any want to return should ventures fail

(iii) Provide training and connect them to support groups to re-orientate and build confidence and skills. Flexible schedules and telecommuting or part-time work.

(iv) Allow time off and open door to return in future. Keep them connected to a support group and provide a sense of belonging (Maslow) to the workplace.

Recruiting and retaining Gen Y and Gen Z

How to retain Baby Boomers

Diversity in today’s workforce is not only about gender, nationality, religious beliefs, culture, but also age and generational differences. Inc.

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Photo credit: Himself taken in Naha, Okinawa, 2017

Different generations bring a diversity of perspectives as well as skill sets to the workplace, adding creativity and better ability to service customers.

Baby Boomers (Born between 1946 and 1964)

They are likely to be already working in the company, and in leadership positions. Gallup found that by age 68, only one third are still in the workplace. As Baby boomers possess institutional knowledge and experience, this can result in a significant brain drain. They can be tapped to provide knowledge transfer to Millennials.

Challenges faced by Baby Boomers include health problems and disabilities, and the need to take care of aging family members.

What companies can do [Dona Dezube, Monster] :

Courtney Templin, president, JB Training Solutions, Chicago and author of “Manager 3.0: A Millennial’s Guide to Rewriting the Rules of Management” suggests:

  • Start a mentor program to engage Baby Boomers to mentor Millennials
  • Part-time consulting and coaching to transfer knowledge
  • Offer a phased retirement option to employees who wish to work part time, drawing part-time salary, partial retirement benefits and must spend 20 percent of their work time mentoring coworkers.
  • Adapt the workplace to be more senior friendly
  • Set up a forum where older workers can share ideas for workplace improvements (BMW).
  • Set up multi-generational workgroups to share knowledge

Personal Motivation: What should I look for in a Job and Maslow