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First, what’s MOJO.

Its that positive spirit toward what we are doing now that starts from the inside and radiates to the outside.

I don’t like acronyms and if you hang around GEN Ys, you get that alot.

FOMO, YOLO

So when I saw a title like MOJO, especially after a colleague used that work, I had to pick up this book.

MOJO by my favourite coach Marshall Goldsmith, whose “What got you here won’t get you there”. Like his previous book, Goldsmith is an executive coach for senior executives and his examples reveal many of such insights with Scorecards and questionnaires and frameworks.

Mind the GAP
There’s a gap between how you see yourself and how others see you.
We sometimes underestimate our great moments and overestimate the impact of our bad moments.

Does anyone ever really change from leadership sessions?
In true Peter Drucker style, Goldsmith answers through a survey of 250,000 respondents.
Very few people achieve positive, lasting change without on-going follow-up.

Unless they know at the end of the day that someone is going to measure if they’re doing what they promised to do, most people fall prey to inertia. (Known as “Hawthorne effect”).

Hence, try the reputation questionnaire

  1. Name six “great” personal moments in the last 12 months at work. (You can consult your calendar and family, but Goldsmith says you can’t ask colleagues. In my opinion, if you can’t even name it, then what’s happened to your personal appraisal.. uh oh.)
  2. What made these moments “great”?
  3. In what way, if any, did these moments resemble one another?
  4. Can you identify the personal quality embodied in that resemblance? Can you give it a name?  For example, if you cite two “great” moments when you went out of your way to help a colleague with advice, you would label that personal quality as “generosity” – which feeds into a reputation for being “generous”
  5. On a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being the most well known, how well known are these “great” moments to people you work with?
  6. On a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being the most agreement, how much would the people you work with, agree with the personal qualities described in your answer to question#4.
  7. Name six “bad” personal moments in the last twelve months
  8. What made these moments “bad”?
  9. What did they have in common?
  10. Can you identify the personal quality they had in common? Can you give it a name? For example, if two “bad” moments involve episodes where you lost your temper, the personal quality could be labeled as “hot-headed”
  11. On a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being the most well known, how well known are these “bad” moments to other people you work with?
  12. On a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being the most agreement, how much would the people you work with, agree with the personal qualities described in your answer to question #10.
  13. Which answer, to question #4 or #10, is most likely your current reputation, or is it both?

If you work for a corporation, this is a useful guide to prepare for the yearly performance appraisal or performance management. Then compare it with the company values. Are you being effective or just busy.   How much do others appreciate what you’re doing?

Useful too, for interviews to get your next job

For those of us, working for ourselves, i.e. entrepreneurs or creatives. Very effective to think about the Brand or the Reputation you’re creating for #Brand You.

I’ve a rude wake-up call.

Consistency and Discipline though, is necessary.
If you’re known as a sarcastic boss, you have to bite your tongue for a long time.
Ask yourself: “Is it worth it?”

  • How much long-term benefit or meaning did I experience form this activity?
  • How much short-term satisfaction or happiness did I experience form this activity?

Change how you approach the same activity. It does not have to be with inertia.

For instance, if you’re about to attend a one-hour, mandatory meeting, your mindset is that the meeting will be a boring waste of time.

You have two options:

Option A: Attend the meeting and be miserable.
Option B: Make the meeting more meaningful and enjoyable. Observe your colleagues more closely or create a new idea to inspire others.

(Download the MOJO Meter)  http://debisilber.com/mojo-meter/

People don’t care what you know, but they know when you care. – John Maxwell

Are you afraid of Feedback? Do you fear that twice a year sit down with your boss on work progress?

Why? I do too.

In fact, I have a deep-seated fear of personal feedback of all kinds, not just from my boss. From anyone.

My friend spilled his venom, of why his promotion had been delayed. His previous boss, a former judge had given him a “D” for his performance appraisal 2 years ago. Now he needs two consecutive “B” to override the “D”. What was more infuriating was that he had no idea what crime he had committed and no way to improve/ go for training. Duh…. His boss did not have the courtesy of having a face-to-face meeting with him. So the feedback came as a shock.

Performance management is painful for all sides. Both for the appraiser and appraised.  The appraiser is afraid of the emotional backlash. The appraised, for the negative feedback. If my boss were to call me up to her/his room, I doubt its to praise me. Ya, I’m too pessimistic.

So what does the research say concerning the performance appraisal process?

The appraisal process is about having a conversation around your performance. Not your boss as a judge passing a sentence.  Properly done, the process starts with setting planned objectives, on-going feedback, how I have met the agreed organisational goals and development needs (if I’ve not).  Remove any of these factors, and it becomes a moving goal-post.

With the best of intentions, some companies do this feedback process twice a year. Beginning, mid point (6 months later), and end of the year (6 months later).  Maybe its just me. I can’t even recall what I ate for lunch 2 days ago, and yet I am expected to remember how I pissed off my colleague.

There is a Chinese saying:

“Duo zuo duo chuo, sao zuo, sao chuo, bu zuo, bu chuo”.

“If you do a lot, you make more mistakes. do fewer, make fewer mistakes. Do nothing, make no mistakes.”

[Read in Chinese, make “no mistakes”, is a play of words and double meaning of “not bad’ = “good”. If you do nothing, you’ll be perceived as good.] It mocks those who are good at critiquing others from an ivory tower, but no efforts of their own. Ouch.

“The 3rd Century Chinese Wei dynasty is renowned for the advancements it made in the creation of a civil service. One of its innovations was something called the nine rank system, by which candidates were selected and categorized, based on their abilities. A bad ranking would wash a candidate right out of the system.

Chinese philosopher Sin Yu, complaining about the bias of the system: “The Imperial Rater of Nine Grades seldom rates men according to their merits but always according to his likes and dislikes,” he complained. Source: http://www.globoforce.com/gfblog/2013/the-exceedingly-curious-origins-of-performance-management/

Not everything that counts, can be counted; not everything that can be counted counts. – Albert Einstein, apparently from a sign hanging in his office.

Performance review nourishes short-term performance, annihilates long-term planning; builds fear, demolishes teamwork and nourishes rivalry and politics. – WE Deming 1982

 

How would you prepare for feedback exercise? Is it really useful?