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Tag Archives: #performance review#

“It’s not really about asking for the raise but knowing and having faith that the system will actually give you the right raises as you go along,” I responded. “And that might be one of the additional superpowers that women who don’t ask for the raise have, because that’s good karma. It’ll come back. Long-term efficiency solves it.” Satya Nadella, CEO of Microsoft said in 2014 at a Conference of Women in Computing when asked what advice he had for women seeking a pay raise who are not comfortable asking.

The comment went viral and met with much criticism.

Nadella subsequently apologised and explained that he had received this advice from his mentors and followed it. But this advice, he noted, underestimated exclusion and bias – conscious and conscious. Any advice that advocates passivity in the face of bias is wrong. Microsoft has since gone on to link pay to diversity and progress.

Source: Fast Company
 

Nadella’s mentors had advised him that human resource systems are short term inefficient but long term efficient. However, underlying that efficiency are advocates or mentors in our career. If no one is advocating for you, then its important that you start doing so for yourself.

In a few months time, we will be preparing for conversations with boss, setting goals for the next quarter. Anticipating more work, ie job enlargement, how does one ask boss for raise, if deserved.

Are there magical words that I can say?
Or the magical resume that can open all doors.

Four seconds, all the time you need to stop counter-productive habits and get.the results you want” by Peter Bregman.

Bregman notes that” it is natural to think the performance review is the perfect opportunity to ask for a raise. But you need to prepare for that conversation a year in advance, zeroing on top priorities and delivering on them.”

I recall my own mistake of working hard without doing the work of finding out what matters to the organisation and delivering on those priorities.

Some things are more important than others. Are we clear on what those are?

Bregman lists a few areas sapping our time. Are you overloaded doing too many things.

Do you spend time:
♤Answering emails that dont matter.
♡Offering opinions that arent necessary.
◇Spending time on issues whose outcomes we cant impact.

Bregman’s formula:

1. At the compensation conversation – ask how you can add value

2. How does your department impact on revenue and what is important to your direct manager and the top leaders?

3. Keep a few of these areas on top of your #to do list#.

4. Share the to do list with your manager make sure you are on the same page.

5. Quantify the impact of the results.

6. If you have a manager who starts asking you to do things outside the top two or three things, have a conversation. (Interestingly I have heard of anecdotal accounts of managers who ask staff to run their personal errands and reward based on these assistance. Some balance is obviously necessary. You have to ask if this is your long term career goal. )

In addition, I have noticed that your manager may have a different scale from you. Do you know their heart beat?

For instance Hofstede observed that managers from collective (group) cultures reward based on trust, loyalty and your effort to build team culture. Those from individualist or achievement culture value individual performance.

Subtly observe what is important to your manager. Do you know his/her heartbeat? What priority keeps their mind up at night?

I am reading “Four seconds, all the time you need to stop counter-productive habits and get.the results you want” by Peter Bregman.

https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-negotiate-salary-37-tips-you-need-to-know

Are you afraid of Feedback? Do you fear that twice a year sit down with your boss on work progress?

Why? I do too.

In fact, I have a deep-seated fear of personal feedback of all kinds, not just from my boss. From anyone.

My friend spilled his venom, of why his promotion had been delayed. His previous boss, a former judge had given him a “D” for his performance appraisal 2 years ago. Now he needs two consecutive “B” to override the “D”. What was more infuriating was that he had no idea what crime he had committed and no way to improve/ go for training. Duh…. His boss did not have the courtesy of having a face-to-face meeting with him. So the feedback came as a shock.

Performance management is painful for all sides. Both for the appraiser and appraised.  The appraiser is afraid of the emotional backlash. The appraised, for the negative feedback. If my boss were to call me up to her/his room, I doubt its to praise me. Ya, I’m too pessimistic.

So what does the research say concerning the performance appraisal process?

The appraisal process is about having a conversation around your performance. Not your boss as a judge passing a sentence.  Properly done, the process starts with setting planned objectives, on-going feedback, how I have met the agreed organisational goals and development needs (if I’ve not).  Remove any of these factors, and it becomes a moving goal-post.

With the best of intentions, some companies do this feedback process twice a year. Beginning, mid point (6 months later), and end of the year (6 months later).  Maybe its just me. I can’t even recall what I ate for lunch 2 days ago, and yet I am expected to remember how I pissed off my colleague.

There is a Chinese saying:

“Duo zuo duo chuo, sao zuo, sao chuo, bu zuo, bu chuo”.

“If you do a lot, you make more mistakes. do fewer, make fewer mistakes. Do nothing, make no mistakes.”

[Read in Chinese, make “no mistakes”, is a play of words and double meaning of “not bad’ = “good”. If you do nothing, you’ll be perceived as good.] It mocks those who are good at critiquing others from an ivory tower, but no efforts of their own. Ouch.

“The 3rd Century Chinese Wei dynasty is renowned for the advancements it made in the creation of a civil service. One of its innovations was something called the nine rank system, by which candidates were selected and categorized, based on their abilities. A bad ranking would wash a candidate right out of the system.

Chinese philosopher Sin Yu, complaining about the bias of the system: “The Imperial Rater of Nine Grades seldom rates men according to their merits but always according to his likes and dislikes,” he complained. Source: http://www.globoforce.com/gfblog/2013/the-exceedingly-curious-origins-of-performance-management/

Not everything that counts, can be counted; not everything that can be counted counts. – Albert Einstein, apparently from a sign hanging in his office.

Performance review nourishes short-term performance, annihilates long-term planning; builds fear, demolishes teamwork and nourishes rivalry and politics. – WE Deming 1982

 

How would you prepare for feedback exercise? Is it really useful?